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Free Webinar -- E-Government in Action: Matching People with Jobs

Check out this free webinar from the American Library Association about how librarians can help patrons in their job search.  The webinar is free, and takes place on Wednesday, May 1, 2013 1:00 PM CDT.  Check out the above link and register to attend.

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All Your Data Are Belong To You: TSA, DHS, devices, and your rights

Allow the Librarian in Black educate you on your rights to privacy (hint:  you don’t have many) when dealing with the TSA, and what it’s like to be on “The List.”

Source: americanlibrariesmagazine.org
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National Library Week PSA featuring Caroline Kennedy appears on the Disney Channel

CHICAGO — New public service announcements (PSA) of National Library Week Honorary Chair Caroline Kennedy are currently appearing on the Disney Channel. Approximately 1.4 million viewers see the PSAs every time they air.

Kennedy appears in the PSA with the star of Disney Channel’s “Austin and Ally,” Laura Marano.  They discuss the value and opportunities available at libraries.
Source: americanlibrariesmagazine.org
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Big Brother is Watching You Study

At Texas A&M, teachers now have a new way to determine their students’ engagement in the curriculum.  In addition to test scores and class participation, they can now open up a program and see which of their students have done their reading.  This is thanks to a company called CourseSmart, which tracks how (and if) students use their electronic textbooks, to create a score called an “Engagement Index.”  Some of the parameters measured include the number of times the textbook is “opened,” amount of time spent reading, pages skipped, notes taken, and passages highlighted.  Proponents say that the tool is for the greater good, because it allows teachers to better understand their students levels of engagement, and allows textbook manufacturers to make better books, by studying how students are using (or misusing) their current texts.  But others feel that digitally hovering over every student’s shoulder as they study is an unnecessary breach of privacy.

Source: lisnews.org
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American Libraries Live: The Present and Future of Ebooks

Be sure and check out this month’s episode of American Libraries Live on Thursday, April 18 at 2:00 PM Eastern Time.  The topic will be Ebooks and the effect of their increasing popularity on libraries.

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Libraries to store all UK web content

The British Library, the National Libraries of Scotland and Wales, the Bodleian Libraries in Oxford, the University Library, Cambridge and the Library of Trinity College, Dublin are teaming up to archive the web (at least, the part of the web that originates from the UK), to ensure that it will be available to future historians and researchers, rather than disappearing into a virtual black hole.  They plan on targeting 4.8 million websites, and estimate that they’ll be archiving around a billion web pages per year.  Sounds like quite the undertaking.

They’ll be not only archiving websites, but also online books, magazine, and journals, even—and this is interesting—material that is behind paywalls.  This material WILL be free to view, but only if you visit the library in person—you won’t be able to access their archived internet from home.

In addition, much like the Library of Congress is already doing, they’ll be archiving all UK tweets.

They’ve also commissioned a survey of the top 100 websites that should be preserved for posterity.  So far, my personal favorite is The Dreamcast Junkyard, a “Blog dedicated to the community of gamers who continue to play Dreamcast games online, despite the fact they were officially discontinued in 2002.”   But even if you’re not into retro gaming, it looks like a very interesting list—I plan to spend some time perusing it later.

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lookslikelibraryscience:

Hi! My name is Rebecca Hickman and I am a singing librarian. Nice to meet you! I’m a huge music fan and I will travel for a good show. I once sang for the Pope and met Bono in the same year! Here’s a link to one of my best blog posts: It’s Only Rock & Roll (or How I Became a Librarian.)

Source: lookslikelibraryscience
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Ebooks are actually not books—schools among first to realize

I’ve always been of the opinion that a book is a book is a book—whether it’s printed on paper, or displayed on a screen.  But perhaps a more nuanced view is required.  This article argues that e-books should not be thought of as books at all, but as software—at least when it comes to how they are bought, sold, and licensed.

Source: lisnews.org
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